public procurement

New “basic procedure” for contracts below EU thresholds

One new procedure will replace the three most commonly used procurement procedures below the EU thresholds. The open bid will disappear, and the basic procedure without negotiations will appear. It is supposed to be easier and more flexible, but will it work?

Grounds for exclusion in the proposed new Public Procurement Law: Closer to the directive

The draft of the new Public Procurement Law, released by the Ministry of Entrepreneurship and Technology on 24 January 2019, proposes changes in the grounds for exclusion of contractors and institution for “self-cleaning,” bringing the Polish regulations closer to Directive 2014/24/EU.

Bid bonds in 2020: same problems, same sanctions

In the proposed new Public Procurement Law, the contracting authority will decide on the obligation to submit a bid bond, regardless of the value of the contract. However, the same restrictive consequences as in the current act are linked with the improper submission of a bid bond, and there are more grounds for retaining bid bonds.

Data protection and public procurement

A key element of the proposed new Public Procurement Law is to regulate the protection of personal data collected in the course of procurement procedures. Significant exceptions from the general rules of the GDPR are planned. What should they consist of?

National Appeals Chamber (KIO) stories: how the KIO was fooled with regard to an electronic signature

A December KIO ruling dealt with an IT aspect of the qualified electronic signature. A contractor had purchased an electronic signature from a trusted supplier, but despite this, the ESPD signed using the electronic signature was invalidated.

SHA – how technology can ruin transparency of public procurement proceedings

Directive 2014/24/EU of 26 February 2014 on Public Procurement only states that “where a tender is signed with the support of a qualified certificate that is included on a trusted list, the contracting authorities shall not apply additional requirements that may hinder the use of those signatures by tenderers”. Unfortunately, the National Appeals Chamber (KIO) took a different view of the issue.